Sunday, March 25, 2012

Red Sonja: She-Devil with a Sword


After a week of work, and too many hours to fully pony up to, I've finished my Red Sonja fan art.  I'm incredibly proud of it, and think it's the best thing I've ever done.  Tomorrow, of course, I'll look at it and feel it is the most horrible thing I've seen - and be embarrassed to even think of it.  Alas, that's my curse - I just have to deal with it and move on to the next piece.

Enjoy!

- Ark

16 comments:

  1. Awesome. Do you mind if I share this over at Red Sonja: She Devil with a Sword? http://redsonjashedevilwithasword.blogspot.com/

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  2. I'm really enjoying watching your artistic skill improve with each picture. Very nice.

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    1. @faoladh - Thanks! It's definitely changing, isn't it?

      - Ark

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  3. Ok. Constructive Criticism.

    Now I have an art degree -- it's not from Yale, like some of our fancy bastards, but this piece is good enough that it's advice time.

    First, This is really really good for self-teaching.

    Second, Push your values. This is most obvious in the hair and shield. (This has to do with the 'hue' representing darkness and lightness for more dynamism)

    She is disconnected from the background, and appears to be floating. The important thing is to make every stroke meaningful. I mean, every time the pen hits the paper, even for something like the background, make the stroke with purposeful intent.

    Noting your style, you might get excellent results by experimenting with line weight. If you're going to comic book outline things, look for ways to add dynamic interest. (Mike Mignola, Personal favorite Brendon and Brian Fraim)

    Draw every day, Do not stop. :-)

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    1. @C - Thanks so much for the constructive criticism. It's like manna from heaven. I know that I have some huge issues with my work, but figuring out what they are, all by myself, has been pretty difficult. Having an informed diagnosis is priceless.

      I've been looking up values today, and yeah, that seems to hit it on the head. I sense a lot of gradient practice in my future.

      The floating thing is a bit tough. I tried. I had hoped the purple would staple her down and stop her from floating off. Not so much - but I didn't know what else to do. I guess I need to look at people's feet a lot more, and how the ground looks under them.

      I had been looking for some type of information on line weight - not that I was using that term - I was thinking 'inking,' but that never really gave me what I needed. I've seen really awesome uses of lines, but never much on how to do so. I took a look at Mignola's work and - wow - what he does is really powerful. It's hard to even comprehend how to pull off something like that. I guess that means I should jump in feet first. :)

      Again, thank you. I really appreciate your help.

      - Ark

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    2. Your work doesn't have a lot of problems. I mean, that's what art is, is solving visual problems. If you ever stop having to experiment with new solutions, you're not growing as an artist.

      So, floating figures.

      First, your hands and feet are good. Your composition is fine, I would have moved her a bit more to the right - you might look into compositional studies.

      Floating figures has to do with the connection to the background. Making marks with intent is key. The figure will cease to float once the background is in some way connected to the figure. They keys for doing this, are the tools in your box. Line (to represent the connection between objects), shading (to represent shadows) and color (to represent the reflection between object and environment).

      Er, not to get into a full lesson here, but the basics are:
      Line -- Objects that are on the same plane have lines that touch. Objects behind other objects have the background object line break before the foreground object. See here for advice.

      Shading -- This is about light. Light is blocked by objects, so this helps provide a connection between objects in the image.

      and Color: Objects that are near each other have their colors blend into each other. Place a green apple on a red table, and the table will have a green tint from the reflection of the apple and the apple will have a red tint from the reflection of the table. Objects near each other share colors. This is not particularly relevant for your style of drawing.

      Nothing complicated here, just some art school basics.

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  4. I really like this piece. Keep up the good work!

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    1. @Bard - Oh, I'll try. Got the next comic to do - plenty of practice there. Yikes - it's already Monday. I had better get to it . . .

      - Ark

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  5. Nice piece. Just remember, all artists had a beginning,and this is yours, so grab it with both hands and throttle the shit out of it until it gives you what you want out of it.

    All the best

    Mark K

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  6. Every artist has his/her own style. This style will evolve over your life. I love your cover, and would love to see a whole comic done this style. DON'T listen to anyone who critiques your art. I guarantee that anything they have done could be dissected as well. Keep it up! "I have taken a course at an art school and you character looks like it is floating"...AHAAHAAAHA. Gimme a break, it's a nice piece. I am a professional animator!

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  7. Every artist has his/her own style. This style will evolve over your life. I love your cover, and would love to see a whole comic done this style. DON'T listen to anyone who critiques your art. I guarantee that anything they have done could be dissected as well. Keep it up! "I have taken a course at an art school and you character looks like it is floating"...AHAAHAAAHA. Gimme a break, it's a nice piece. I am a professional animator!

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