Tuesday, February 25, 2014

A Tale of Fire and Ice and Grass and Wood

The D&D 40th Anniversary Blog Hop Challenge

Day 25: Longest running campaign/gaming group you've been in.

That's kind of like two questions in one.  Gaming groups are kind of hard to nail down for me - they grow and change over time.  So it's hard to say where one group ended and another began.  Campaigns can be that way too if you stick with a setting and always play in it, no matter who is around.

So, let's limit this to a campaing with a specific group.  Okay - that's easier for me. :)

It would be the Sea of Tears campaign - lasting from the summer of 2008 to the summer of 2010.  It was (gasp) a 4e game in a world that had been flooded so that only the tops of mountains stuck out of the sea.  I had just returned from a lake vacation - thus the aquatic feel.The campaign focused on a save the world plot, and after two years, the party did indeed save the world - twice.

It was a fun campaign and I met some great people.  Sadly, we lost a player at the end due to cancer.  Give the blog a search for Sea of Tears if you are interested in more about it.

- Ark

6 comments:

  1. I have to admit I love that picture, whatever it is about! I draw stuff like that all the time with coloured pencils.

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    1. Honestly, I have NO idea what the picture is about either. It just happened. But feel free to make something up. :)

      - Ark

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  2. Sometimes, normally incorporeal spritelings manage to get themselves caught inside growing plants. There they remain trapped until the plant fruits, at which time they are able to manifest a small face and attempt to communicate with passers-by. Releasing such a spriteling from it's vegan prison is simple; it must be thrown at a hard surface to split the berry. This releases both the spriteling and a blast of magical energy. Unscrupulous persons often carry these berries about until the magical effect is needed, but the spritelings may turn their wrath upon their jailer if they were forced to wait too long. Four common types are woodberries, which cause trees in the area of affect to grow as though ten years had passed; grassberries, which grow a layer of sod that replaces all other ground cover and shrubbery; flameberries which burst as a 2d6 fireball, igniting all flammable objects that fail their save; and iceberries, which flash freeze anything failing a save and causing 2d6 of cold damage. Other less common varieties are known to exist.

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    1. Okay Dave, you have excelled yourself. That is awesome!

      - Ark

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    2. Thanks! If you don't mind, I want to use the idea and your picture in my next OD&D game. I'm thinking the party will find a blueberry patch that happens to have a few iceberries in it, crying for help!

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    3. Yes - by all means. Please harass your players with fruit!

      - Ark

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